9 Minutes from Manhattan
90 million years back in time

 
 

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T-REX


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FAST FACTS

PERIOD: LATE CRETACEOUS
LENGTH: UP TO 12.8 M
WEIGHT: UP TO 6.8 TONS

How do you say it?

tye-RAN-uh-SAWR-us recks

Discovery:

When:       1905
Where:      Wyoming
By Who:     Barnum Brown
 

Fun Facts: 

Paleontologist Mary Schweitzer and her colleagues have discovered soft tissues and
proteins preserved in T. rex remains.

T. rex was one of the largest land carnivores that ever lived.

Although not quite the largest carnivorous dinosaur, T. rex certainly had the biggest teeth of
any carnivore, measuring 30 cm (12 in) in length.

T. rex reached maturity at 16 or 18 years old, and for a few years before that, gained over
600 kg (1,300 lb) each year.

Hunter or Scavenger

Was T. rex a predator or scavenger?

The debate over whether T. rex was a scavenger or an active predator has been ongoing almost since the dinosaur was first described. Many paleontologists have used numerous lines of evidence to support or refute one side of the argument or the other, and most have very valid points. So, how do we decide?

If you look closely enough, nature reveals the answer to almost any question, and most often nature points us to somewhere near the middle. Think about any large predator today- bears, lions, hyenas, wolves, sharks, komodo dragons- they all are active hunters, and yet none of them will pass up a free meal, whether it is a carcass they happen to come across, or by stealing another predator's recent kill. So if someone asks you whether T. rex was a predator or scavenger, you can just say, "Yes!"