9 Minutes from Manhattan
90 million years back in time

 
 

2017 Season

 

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June 27-September 4

10a-6p

 

 

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DRYPTOSAURUS


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FAST FACTS

PERIOD: LATE CRETACEOUS
LENGTH: 7.5 M
WEIGHT: 3000 LBS

How do you say it?

DRIP-tuh-SAWR-us

Discovery:

When:       1866
Where:      Gloucester County, New Jersey
By Who:    E.D. Cope
 

Fun Facts 

Dryptosaurus was closely related to and lived at the same time as Tyrannosaurus rex.

Dryptosaurus was the subject of one of the most famous, forward-thinking illustrations in the
history of the science.

Dryptosaurus was the world’s second nearly complete dinosaur skeleton, and the first of a
carnivorous dinosaur.

The Dryptosaurus specimen presented here at Field Station: Dinosaurs is the world's first three-dimensional representation of this dinosaur. 

New Jersey

What does New Jersey have to do with dinosaurs?

Southern New Jersey and Philadelphia were once the most important areas in the world for dinosaur paleontology. In the late 1800's, many of the world's most famous paleontologists lived and/or worked there, mainly because of the amazing abundance and quality of the fossils being discovered in the marl mines in the southern half of New Jersey.

Hadrosaurus foulkii and Dryptosaurus aquilnguis were the world's first and second nearly complete dinosaur skeletons, respectively: both were found in Gloucester County, NJ. New Jersey can also claim more dinosaur species and individual specimens than any other state in the eastern U.S. 

There are several museums in the state where you can learn a lot more about dinosaurs in New Jersey and the region. The New Jersey State Museum in Trenton, NJ has a long and distinguished history in paleontology, and is still actively researching and collecting dinosaur and other fossil specimens across the state and continent.